Ten days to Remembrance Day

Ten days to Remembrance Day: The Brooding Soldier by Frederick Chapman in the village of Saint-Julien. This monument commemorates Canada’s role in the Second Battle of Ypres (First World War) where poison gas was used as a weapon for the first time in the war, on April 22, 1915. Between April 22-24, just over 2,000 Canadian soldiers were killed, wounded or missing, as the Canadian First Division fought to hold the fractured front line. Doc Alexander wasn’t at the Second Battle of Ypres. He arrived at the front in 1916, serving first as a gunner with Canadian Field Artillery and then with the 11th Field Ambulance  and was in Europe until 1919. He was, however, gassed in a later attack.

The Brooding Soldier. Rob Alexander photo

The Brooding Soldier. Rob Alexander photo

Eil, Germany, January 1919. Doc Alexander, left, with the goat. Bubby Robinson, centre. Bill Weir, right.

Eil, Germany, January 1919. Doc Alexander, left, with the goat. Bubby Robinson, centre. Bill Weir, right.

The Brooding Soldier. Rob Alexander photo

The Brooding Soldier. Rob Alexander photo

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About Rob Alexander

I am a writer, photographer and historian and the author of The History of Canmore, published by Summerthought Publishing of Banff, AB.

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